Immigration

Published on November 26th, 2014

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Kerry Banes: Is Obama Clutching at Straws on Immigration?

KB bw

Kerry Baynes attends Bloomfield College in New Jersey. As a Republican research assistant for the New Jersey State Senate he was responsible for preparing research on: economic, budget/fiscal issues, and the impact of tax policy.

In yesterday’s speech, on C-SPAN, President Obama claimed that he was frustrated by the House of Representatives failure to act on an immigration reform bill, and that that frustration led him to initiate his recently instituted Executive Order. This appears to be a grasp at straws to avoid the “Lame Duck President” moniker. Clearly, implementing the advice of Former President Bill Clinton, whose particular judgement I put little to no credence in due to the fact that he exhibited unabated dishonesty when dealing with the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

What President Obama did not mention is the fact that the Senate, which is controlled by his party, has held jobs bills passed by the lower house, and he has not found a reason to address these members of his own party, for their failure to deal with the growing economic concerns of everyday Americans. In addition, members of his own party disagree with his handling of Immigration Reform. Is Immigration Reform necessary. Most, if not all, of Americans would agree. Does it supersede the need for jobs, and a jobs bill, in our fragile recovery? This is where he and I tend to disagree.

The Keystone XL pipeline is a clear example of the Democratic Party putting politics ahead of the people. How could you vote against jobs for the American people. Is it because of the loss suffered during the mid term elections. If so, then it’s self explanatory. The immigrants affected by the Executive Order are already here. We can only realistically deport but so many people. How their existence, besides being an admission that there is a broken system, rank as a national priority, above jobs and economic recovery. Whether they stay, or leave is not going to decide the fate of the economy, if they have no jobs to earn a living. People choose to come to the United States because of the economic stability.

Fundamentally, Immigration Reform should be about streamlining the application process, and making the borders safe from drug cartels engaged in human trafficking. With computers that are able to make cognitive representations of our physical world, so much so that they are competent enough to play games as complex as chess, it is not unfathomable to think that with that technology the application time-frame could not be shrinked to as little as one day. In the time that it takes someone to get a drivers license, they should be able to legally gain access to citizenship.

One machine could conduct the finger printing, DNA collection, and facial recognition necessary to determine an individuals criminal background history. Both the knowledge, and means test could also be automated. Once those are complete, the physical interview and issuing the necessary documentation could be done in minutes, and then sent by mail –or, bet yet, electronically. With the advent of computers the need for centralized record keeping is achievable at enumerable locations simultaneously. The impact on the economy, from designing and implementing these changes, has immense potential for both the private sector and the public sector.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Kerry Baynes attends Bloomfield College in New Jersey. As a Republican research assistant for the New Jersey State Senate he was responsible for preparing research on: economic, budget/fiscal issues, and the impact of tax policy. He holds a degree in Business Management, and has 2 years of legislative policy experience.

He is the founder of a company that specializes in formulating grant applications for non-profit organization 

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